Jan 012018
 

To mark the first day of every month in 2018, we will be looking at a range of illustrations which Land Girls themselves drew and sent in for The Land Girl magazine. Not only were Land Girls and Lumber Jills working hard on the land and in the forests, but some also found the time to put pen to paper and draw!

In 1942, the front page of The Land Girl contained the following about the rotation of illustrations for The Land Girl covers:

New Departures from the front page of the April 1942 edition of The Land Girl.

New Departures from the front page of the April 1942 edition of The Land Girl.

Not only are these illustrations interesting to look at, but they are are useful for considering how Land Girls came to represent their experiences – sometimes humorously, sometimes seriously. As you can see from the selection of images below, some were simple sketches such as the one used for January 1942. Others were more detailed, as seen with the effective use of shading by Audrey Wakeford and Anthea Shelmerdine for January 1946 and 1947 respectively. These illustrations portray Land Girls undertaking several jobs such as feeding lambs, milking cows, delivering milk, clearing, and picking potatoes.


The Land Girl Image January 1942

January 1942 by Miss Barbara Hey.

The Land Girl Image January 1943

January 1943, by Miss J Salisbury (72819), Warwickshire.

The Land Girl Image January 1944

January 1944 by Miss Audrey Wakeford (40839), Berkshire

The Land Girl Image January 1945

January 1945 by E.Wright (73902), who won first prize in a WLA Handicrafts Exhibition in West Suffolk.

The Land Girl Image January 1946

January 1946 by Audrey Wakeford (40839), Berkshire, whose work makes another appearance.

The Land Girl Image January 1947

January 1947 by Anthea Shelmerdine (36469), Salop


 

Oct 112017
 
Dorothy Clayden

Dorothy Clayden

This series of posts charts Dorothy Clayden’s time in the Women’s Land Army form 1942 to 1946. This final post in our series brings together some documents concerning VE Day and the end of Dorothy’s service in 1946.

Dorothy’s daughter Judi Wilkinson recounts how her mother’s time in the WLA provided her with the skills to grow and maintain a successful and productive vegetable and fruit garden for over 30 years.

In later life, Dorothy had a successful career as a college lecturer in hairdressing.

Many thanks to Dorothy’s daughter Judi for sharing with me the photos and correspondence of her mother’s time in the WLA.


A letter sent to Dorothy about VE Day.

A letter sent to Dorothy about the giving of holiday for VE Day.

 

A letter sent to Dorothy about a dance happening at the reopening of the WLA club.

A letter sent to Dorothy about a dance happening at the reopening of the WLA club.

 

Dorothy's WLA Certficate

Dorothy’s WLA Certficate


 

Oct 092017
 
Dorothy Clayden

Dorothy Clayden

This series of posts charts Dorothy Clayden’s time in the Women’s Land Army form 1942 to 1946. This fourth looks at Dorothy’s transfer to Pest Destruction in Shrewsbury in 1944.

Here, she was issued with extensive advice on rat catching and the different protocols which could be followed. Be sure to scroll to the end of this post to see a newspaper article on Dorothy’s work as a ‘Lady-Killer of Vermin’!

 

 

 

 

 

 


 

 

 

 

Dorothy Clayden Ratcathching

Dorothy Clayden Ratcathching

 

Dorothy ratcatching!

Dorothy ratcatching!

 

Letter sent to Dorothy in March 1944 with instructions on rat catching.

Letter sent to Dorothy in March 1944 with instructions on rat catching.

 

Rats and Mice Destruction instructions.

Rats and Mice Destruction instructions.

 

Employment conditions relating to rat catching.

Employment conditions relating to rat catching.

 

Newspaper article on the 'Lady-Killers' of Vermim

Newspaper article on the ‘Lady-Killers’ of Vermim


 

Oct 072017
 
Dorothy Clayden

Dorothy Clayden

This series of posts charts Dorothy Clayden’s time in the Women’s Land Army form 1942 to 1946. This third looks at Dorothy’s first billet in Shropshire.

We don’t have as many documents on this stage of Dorothy’s journey. However, we do know that Dorothy lived with a couple called Kit and Eva in Shropshire in 1942 to around 1944.

 

 

 


Dorothy's first billet in Shropshire.

Dorothy’s first billet in Shropshire.

 

Kit and Eva's House - Dorothy's very first billet

Kit and Eva’s House – Dorothy’s very first billet

 

Kit's and Eva's ducks.  Dorothy writes on the back of the photograph how 'they were for Xmas, but we couldn't kill them'.

Kit’s and Eva’s ducks. Dorothy writes on the back of the photograph how ‘they were for Xmas, but we couldn’t kill them’. It was very easy for people to get attached to animals!

 

Farm workers at Kit's farm?

Farm workers on Kit and Eva’s farm?


 

Dec 282014
 
Committee Member Award Letter, 31st August 1945 Source: The late Shropshire historian Rachel Brenda Lees

Committee Member Award Letter, 31st August 1945
Source: The late Shropshire historian Rachel Brenda Lees

Apr 182014
 
Advice given to new Women's Land Army recruits in Shropshire. Source: Rachel Brenda Lees

Advice given to new Women’s Land Army recruits in Shropshire.
Source: Rachel Brenda Lees

Apr 182014
 
Women's Land Army Representatives for Shropshire (Page 1) Source: Rachel Brenda Lees

Women’s Land Army Representatives for Shropshire (Page 1)
Source: Rachel Brenda Lees

Women's Land Army Representatives for Shropshire (Page 2) Source: Rachel Brenda Lees

Women’s Land Army Representatives for Shropshire (Page 2)
Source: Rachel Brenda Lees

Apr 182014
 
Committee Member Award Letter dated 31st August 1945 addressed to Mrs Lees from County Secretary. Source: Rachel Brenda Lees

Committee Member Award Letter dated 31st August 1945 addressed to Mrs Lees from County Chairman.
Source: Rachel Brenda Lees

Sep 202013
 

WLA Shropshire Recruitment Poster

 

PDF Women’s Land Army (Shropsire) Recruitment Poster

This information comes from the late Shropshire historian Rachel Brenda Lees.