Women’s forestry work

 

Lumber Jills undertook a range of roles (location dependent) which included: measuring, census and stock taking, felling, pole selection, pit-prop preparation, haulage, and sawmilling. Women could work as general foresters or measurers, with the opportunity for promotion into the roles of Forewomen, Gangers in England and Wales, or Leader Girls in Scotland.The MoS noted how in 1942 alone, the WTC had contributed towards saving 50 tons of shipping space per year.

Though the exact proportion is uncertain, most WTC members worked as general foresters, with a smaller number undertaking specialist roles in measuring and felling.20 Women initially undertook roles which did not require extensive training and experience. Yet, as the war progressed, women developed the skills and experience to undertake more specialist roles, such as measuring. The measurer role required women, typically with a higher standard of education, to handle figures accurately. The WTC application and training process focused on the potential to learn and perform skilled work, more so than the WLA.

Lumber Jills (aka members of the Women's Timber Corps) at Culford Camp. Margaret Elizabeth Sutherland (nee Coldwell) at Culford Camp, Suffolk

Lumber Jills stripping bark at Culford Camp in Suffolk.

 

Lumber Jills (aka members of the Women's Timber Corps) at Culford Camp. Margaret Elizabeth Sutherland (nee Coldwell) at Culford Camp, Suffolk

Lumber Jills (aka members of the Women’s Timber Corps) at Culford Camp, Suffolk.