Oct 012016
 

Women's Land Army Ploughing, Second World War

From left to right, top to bottom:

  • A member of the Women’s Land Army is trained in the traditional horse-drawn method of ploughing at the WLA training centre at Cannington in Somerset, c 1940. Source: IWM
  • Land Girl Ploughing. Source: Cherish Watton
  • Ploughing up arable fields at Colmworth. Source: Stuart Antrobus.
  • Land girl wearing tin helmet while ploughing – south-east of England. Source: Stuart Antrobus
  • A Land Army girl using a tractor to plough a field at the Agricultural College at Cannington. Source: IWM

Farming activities included:

  • Ewes dipped and wool clipped around tail, ready for tupping to begin [Mating time]
  • Unfinished wether lambs sold as stores or brought inside for further fattening House feeding cattle
  • Wean and house calves
  • Cultivate arable fields
  • Drill winter wheat
  • Harvest potatoes
  • Harvest sugar beet

 

Source: Farm Direct.co.uk

Jan 012016
 
As a new initative for 2016, Stuart Antrobus and I will be replacing the ‘Cartoon of the Month’ with ‘Farming Activity of the Month’. We will try to reflect the farming tasks which would have been undertaken by Land Girls at different times throughout the year.
Do you have photos of Land Girls carrying out different farming tasks? If you do, send them across, and we can include them in our monthly collages.

January Milking Collage

From left to right, top to bottom:

  • Joyce Malpass busy with dairy work at Simkins’ Mount Pleasant Farm, Lower Stondon, Bedfordshire in the 1940s. Courtesy of Stuart Antrobus.
  • 29 year old Land Girl Rosalind Cox (left) carries milk pails in the dairy on Mr Tupper’s farm at Bignor in Sussex, as her colleague Helen Newmarch sits on a stool to milk ‘Cleopatra’. The cattle here are shorthorn cows. Helen was from Worthing and was a shorthand typist before joining the Land Army. Source: IWM D 18057
  • Land Girls were introduced to agricultural practice and ‘nature’ through the use of contemporary technology. Dunbar plays with the obvious visual humour of the surreal situation. At what point does the machine stop pretending to be a cow? The painting is also a comment on how technologically driven modern, urban life has now become the means of access to both agriculture and, by implication, the natural world. Source: IWM ART LD 766
  • A member of the Women’s Land Army milks a cow, probably at the WLA training centre at Cannington, Somerset, c 1940. Source: IWM D186
  • Ivy Archer (nee Lock) milking a cow with a fellow Land Girl in Exmoor. Source: Unforgotten Exmoor
Apr 192014
 
A member of the Women's Land Army is trained in the use of a tractor plough at the WLA training centre at Cannington, Somerset, c 1940. A farmer and two horses can just be seen in the background. Source: IWM D 119

A member of the Women’s Land Army is trained in the use of a tractor plough at the WLA training centre at Cannington, Somerset, c 1940. A farmer and two horses can just be seen in the background.
Source: IWM D 119