Jun 142018
 
My mother was based in Buckinghamshire, I believe at Finmere or Tingewick. She met my father there when he was stationed in the army at Tingewick in 1946. Her name was Kitty Bland and my fathers name was Sydney Freshwater. She came from a children’s home in North London.
I would like to also know more about her life. I am attaching a photo, which you are welcome to use on the site. My mother has her face scratched and is only partially visible. I am looking for someone with another copy of better quality…..long shot I know. The other ladies in the photo are, left to right, back to front (I guess) Joyce Charlton, Kitty Bland, Ena Smith, Sadie Brown, Joan Heaton.
Jean Watts, Kitty’s daughter.
Joyce Charlton, Kitty Bland, Ena Smith, Sadie Brown, Joan Heaton working in the WLA in Buckinghamshire.

Joyce Charlton, Kitty Bland, Ena Smith, Sadie Brown, Joan Heaton working in the WLA in Buckinghamshire.

Apr 232016
 
Stooking sheaves of corn at harvest time somewhere in Buckinghamshire in the summer of 1944. This was the way that the corn was left out to dry before storing in hay ricks. Source: Daily Mail Archives

Stooking sheaves of corn at harvest time somewhere in Buckinghamshire in the summer of 1944. This was the way that the corn was left out to dry before storing in hay ricks.
Source: Daily Mail Archives
Courtesy: Stuart Antrobus

Aug 302014
 

The Honorary Florence Fremantle belonged to a Buckinghamshire family with long standing army connections. Her father, Lord Cottesloe, was Colonel of the Bucks Battalion Territorial Army. Her brother Halford died in battle in 1915 and this had a profound effect on the 17-year-old girl.

His loss served to galvanise her determination to serve the war effort and as soon as the Board of Agriculture organised the Women’s Land Army she joined.

As one of 23,000 across the country who first signed up to fill the gaps left by men who had gone to war, Florence felt she was honouring Halford’s memory, as well as helping food production for her country.

She was sent to Hertfordshire where she wrote poems and songs and began sketching and painting. She was asked to write a girl’s Land Army song to encourage national recruitment, and one of her paintings focused on the place where her beloved brother was buried.

Information from article on Duty and Service: Bucks Lives in the Great War